Workers Solidarity Movement

Anarchist news & analysis from Ireland's WSM. For more information see http://www.wsm.ie/
It’s Time to Think Outside the Box - see you at the 9th Dublin Anarchist book fair 12th April Liberty Hall - #dabf http://thndr.it/1hdMwtA

It’s Time to Think Outside the Box - see you at the 9th Dublin Anarchist book fair 12th April Liberty Hall - #dabf http://thndr.it/1hdMwtA

Exploring the Legacy of 1913 and its lessons for today2013 marks the 100th anniversary of what many see as the most significant industrial dispute ever to have taken place in Ireland - the Dublin Lockout. The employers of Dublin, led by William Martin Murphy, locked out over 20,000 workers in an attempt to starve them into submission and to smash the increasingly popular Irish Transport and General Workers Union (ITGWU).One of the Bookfair highlights will be a meeting at which a panel of speakers will explore the legacy of 1913 and its lessons for the trade union movement of today. Padraig Yeates (author of ‘Lockout’), Brian Hanley (historian and author), Mary Muldowney (author of many books and articles on women’s labour history) and Gregor Kerr (WSM member and Irish National Teachers Organisation activist) will each take a unique look at the relevance of 1913 and why it retains such importance among trade union organisers and activists one hundred years on.Part of the 8th Dublin anarchist bookfair - RSVP athttps://www.facebook.com/events/118423295002829

Exploring the Legacy of 1913 and its lessons for today

2013 marks the 100th anniversary of what many see as the most significant industrial dispute ever to have taken place in Ireland - the Dublin Lockout. The employers of Dublin, led by William Martin Murphy, locked out over 20,000 workers in an attempt to starve them into submission and to smash the increasingly popular Irish Transport and General Workers Union (ITGWU).

One of the Bookfair highlights will be a meeting at which a panel of speakers will explore the legacy of 1913 and its lessons for the trade union movement of today. Padraig Yeates (author of ‘Lockout’), Brian Hanley (historian and author), Mary Muldowney (author of many books and articles on women’s labour history) and Gregor Kerr (WSM member and Irish National Teachers Organisation activist) will each take a unique look at the relevance of 1913 and why it retains such importance among trade union organisers and activists one hundred years on.

Part of the 8th Dublin anarchist bookfair - RSVP athttps://www.facebook.com/events/118423295002829

The Art of Resistance: Image-ing a new Middle East, which will explore the ways ‘art as defiance’ is re-imagining power across the Middle East .Part of the 2013 Dublin Anarchist book fair - event at https://www.facebook.com/events/118423295002829/

The Art of Resistance: Image-ing a new Middle East, which will explore the ways ‘art as defiance’ is re-imagining power across the Middle East .

Part of the 2013 Dublin Anarchist book fair - event at https://www.facebook.com/events/118423295002829/

Irish Anarchist Review 7 hits the streets on April 6th.
When we speak of rebuilding a movement from below, it is important that we do not exclude the voices of the marginalised. In “The Politics of Voices: Notes on Gender, Race & Class”, Aidan Rowe looks at some of the pitfalls we face as class struggle anarchists attempting to build a society without hierarchy. He rejects vulgar Marxists ideas “of the base-superstructure model (that) holds that the base determines the superstructure absolutely and the superstructure is unable to affect the base” and the implication that if we end class exploitation, all other forms of oppression will disappear. At the same time he also rejects “a stultifying and inward-looking liberal-idealist identity politics, concerned fetishistically with the identification of privilege and the self-regulation of individual oppressive behaviour to the (near) exclusion of organised struggle, which, while amplifying the voices of the marginalised, consigns them to an echo chamber where they can resonate harmlessly” and argues for “bringing together a diversity of experiences and struggles in a spirit of solidarity and mutual recognition”.Get yours at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair!

Irish Anarchist Review 7 hits the streets on April 6th.

When we speak of rebuilding a movement from below, it is important that we do not exclude the voices of the marginalised. In “The Politics of Voices: Notes on Gender, Race & Class”, Aidan Rowe looks at some of the pitfalls we face as class struggle anarchists attempting to build a society without hierarchy. He rejects vulgar Marxists ideas “of the base-superstructure model (that) holds that the base determines the superstructure absolutely and the superstructure is unable to affect the base” and the implication that if we end class exploitation, all other forms of oppression will disappear. At the same time he also rejects “a stultifying and inward-looking liberal-idealist identity politics, concerned fetishistically with the identification of privilege and the self-regulation of individual oppressive behaviour to the (near) exclusion of organised struggle, which, while amplifying the voices of the marginalised, consigns them to an echo chamber where they can resonate harmlessly” and argues for “bringing together a diversity of experiences and struggles in a spirit of solidarity and mutual recognition”.

Get yours at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair!

The Irish Anarchist Review will be available next Saturday at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair!"With the escalating neo-liberalisation of urban space, the right to the city has re-emerged as a demand among activists. Tom Murray looks back at the struggle of working class people in Dublin in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s for decent, affordable housing against the onslaught of property speculation. He describes how “The Dublin Housing Action Committee, combined building voluntary networks of the homeless with holding prominent, public demonstrations aimed at publicising demands for social housing.” Drawing some lessons for the struggle today, he concludes that “If such a politics were to take organisational form, the Dublin Housing Action Committee would approximate a good working model of direct action and co-operative practice that communities, left political parties and non-aligned activists could aspire to.”Don’t forget to get yours!

The Irish Anarchist Review will be available next Saturday at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair!

"With the escalating neo-liberalisation of urban space, the right to the city has re-emerged as a demand among activists. Tom Murray looks back at the struggle of working class people in Dublin in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s for decent, affordable housing against the onslaught of property speculation. He describes how “The Dublin Housing Action Committee, combined building voluntary networks of the homeless with holding prominent, public demonstrations aimed at publicising demands for social housing.” Drawing some lessons for the struggle today, he concludes that “If such a politics were to take organisational form, the Dublin Housing Action Committee would approximate a good working model of direct action and co-operative practice that communities, left political parties and non-aligned activists could aspire to.”

Don’t forget to get yours!

Irish Anarchist Review 7 hits the streets on April 6th.
In Locked Out: Dublin 1913, Donal Ó Fallúin looks at the politics, ideas and misconceptions around the Dublin Lockout of 1913, and shows that the event is much more complex than many have allowed it to be, by attempting to narrow it down to a small event within the nationalist narrative of the period.
You can pick up your copy first at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair on April 6th or later at the usual spots in Dublin, Belfast and Cork and international outlets.

Irish Anarchist Review 7 hits the streets on April 6th.

In Locked Out: Dublin 1913, Donal Ó Fallúin looks at the politics, ideas and misconceptions around the Dublin Lockout of 1913, and shows that the event is much more complex than many have allowed it to be, by attempting to narrow it down to a small event within the nationalist narrative of the period.

You can pick up your copy first at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair on April 6th or later at the usual spots in Dublin, Belfast and Cork and international outlets.

Irish Anarchist Review 7 hits the streets on April 6th.In General Strike: Protest or Process, Mark Hoskins takes a critical look at the demand from sections of the left, that union leaders name the day for a general strike. He looks at the specific interests the union leaders represent and poses an alternative to bureaucratic unionism and stage managed days of protest. Taking a look at strike movements around Europe and noting the low level of struggle at the moment in Ireland, he argues “If we popularise the idea of industrial direct action on a small scale, using real examples and modern communication technology, we can begin to talk about a general strike, about generalising the struggle that exists in society.”You can pick up your copy first at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair on April 6th or later at the usual spots in Dublin, Belfast and Cork and international outlets.

Irish Anarchist Review 7 hits the streets on April 6th.

In General Strike: Protest or Process, Mark Hoskins takes a critical look at the demand from sections of the left, that union leaders name the day for a general strike. He looks at the specific interests the union leaders represent and poses an alternative to bureaucratic unionism and stage managed days of protest. Taking a look at strike movements around Europe and noting the low level of struggle at the moment in Ireland, he argues “If we popularise the idea of industrial direct action on a small scale, using real examples and modern communication technology, we can begin to talk about a general strike, about generalising the struggle that exists in society.”

You can pick up your copy first at the Dublin Anarchist Bookfair on April 6th or later at the usual spots in Dublin, Belfast and Cork and international outlets.

Across Europe women estimate that on average they spend 30 hours providing childcare compared with 17 hours for men, and 14 hours on care for the elderly compared with 11 hours for men. Housework occupies 16 hours a week for women and 10 hours for men.

Across Europe women estimate that on average they spend 30 hours providing childcare compared with 17 hours for men, and 14 hours on care for the elderly compared with 11 hours for men. Housework occupies 16 hours a week for women and 10 hours for men.